Begin Main Content Area
Media > DCNR > Details

Wolf Administration Announces State Investment to Plant Streamside Forest Buffers

10/23/2020

​New Freedom, PA -- The Wolf Administration today announced grant funding to plant trees along streams to improve water quality in Pennsylvania, and eventually the Chesapeake Bay. An investment of $673,700 from the Keystone Fund and other funds will support the planting of about 93 acres of streamside (riparian) buffers in the commonwealth.

“By slowing down runoff after it rains, and filtering out sediments and nutrients, streamside forest buffers are among the best practices to help us clean up our rivers and streams in Pennsylvania,” Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn said.

Dunn today helped plant a streamside forest buffer in Marge Goodfellow Park in New Freedom Borough, York County.

About 60 trees and shrubs are being planted to align with the park's development/improvement plans. Benches and signage will be added to the planting for the community to enjoy.

The five grants for streamside forest buffers are:

  • Centre County -- ClearWater Conservancy, $97,800, for approximately 10 acres of riparian forest buffers along waterways in the Susquehanna River Watershed.
  • Centre, Clinton, Huntingdon, and Lycoming Counties -- Chesapeake Conservancy, $50,000, for approximately 7 acres of riparian forest buffers along waterways in the Susquehanna River Watershed.
  • Chester and Lancaster Counties -- Stroud Water Research Center Inc, $154,000, for approximately 32 acres of riparian forest buffers along waterways in the Lower Susquehanna River and Lower Delaware River watersheds.
  • Lancaster County -- Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, Inc., $286,900, for approximately 34 acres of riparian forest buffers along waterways in the Susquehanna River Watershed.
  • Lehigh and Northampton Counties -- Wildlands Conservancy, $85,000, for approximately 10 acres of riparian forest buffers along waterways in the Lehigh River Watershed.

Properly planted and maintained, streamside tree and shrub plantings filter the runoff of sediments and fertilizers that are applied to lawns and crops; control erosion; slow stormwater runoff; cool stream temperatures; and improve fish habitat.

More information about Community Conservation Partnerships Program Grants is on the DCNR website.

MEDIA CONTACT: Christina Novak, 717-579-5177

# # #

Share This